NAILBITER PRE-ORDER FORM

"Nailbiter" is an awesome new series from Image Comics. I know because I have the pleasure of editing it. I don’t take on much work these days that isn’t finite. I value my time and an ongoing series can be exactly that — ongoing with a monthly grind that never ends. It can become a chore, and one that’s tough to escape. But that’s not the case here. I believe in this stellar creative team, the story, and this book’s potential. In other words, “Nailbiter” has the goods to become your new favorite comic.

I’ve known Josh Williamson as a writer and a friend for close to a decade, and this is the first chance I’ve had to really work on a project with him. He’s cooking up something special.

Mike Henderson is a guy I’ve wanted to work with for years in any capacity, and I was even planning to write something for him to draw before Josh snatched him up for “Masks and Mobsters,” and now this project. Mike is a break-out talent and this will be the series to thrust him into the mainstream for good.

I can’t say enough good things about our colorist, Adam Guzowski, who’s upping his game with every page. There are plenty of colorists out there doing very nice work, but not all of them know how to set a mood. Adam gets that, and I can’t wait to see him continue to grow as we continue this. (Did I mention it’s an ongoing series).

John J. Hill is a name you know, even if you don’t know his name. He’s done TONS of stellar work for DC Comics/Vertigo, both as a letterer and a designer. He’s done other cool freelance stuff, but I can guarantee you’ve seen his name on that stuff even if you don’t read down past writer/artist. He’s doing the same thing here (though the also awesome Tim Daniel did the logo design) and, like Adam, helping set the tone for this series.

It’s creepy. It’s scary. It’s also a lot of fun. No doom and gloom, just interesting characters in a fantastic setting all ping ponging off each other with a mystery and plenty of conflict keeping things moving.

Print out this form, fill it out, and pre-order “Nailbiter” #1 (and beyond) so we can continue unraveling this mystery for all of you.

thejoshuawilliamson:

When you go to your local comic shop this week be sure to print out the Nailbiter Pre-order form and let them know that you want a copy of Nailbiter #1. It’s seems like just yesterday we were announcing our new horror comic at Image Expo and May 7th is going to get here fast.

image

(W) Joshua…

howtobesplendid asked: So, I'm writing the second issue of my comic book series, and I get to final stretch of the rough draft, when I suddenly realize that I could make the issue so much better if i re-wrote the last eight pages completely. Is there anything I can do it in the plotting process to prevent such backtracking?

kierongillen:

Sadly, no.

I mean, sometimes if you planned it better certain aspects or problems or better ways of doing things will come more to the fore meaning there will be less rewriting… but that’s a maybe, and pretty much unprovable in practice. No matter how I’ve planned it, things in execution surprise me.

You  can google up a million and one quotes which basically say “writing is rewriting.” That’s basically because it is. At least it is for a lot of writer’s experiences.

(For a contrary take, I think of Vonnegut’s Swooper vs Basher dichotomy, where he thinks there’s basically two kinds of writers. Swoopers just write-write-write and get the whole thing down, before reworking intensely. Bashers write a sentence at a time, and when each line is done, it’s done. Obv, an over-generalisation, but a neat one which seems applicable. I’m clearly a swooper, but I’ve known a few bashers in my time. I sort of view them like a Klingon views a Vulcan. They just don’t make any sense to me, which is kinda the point.)

To be honest, while the response to realising you have to do more work is always a “NO, MUM! I DON’T WANT TO TIDY MY BEDROOM!” you should be grateful of it. A little work now is one thing, but realising you could have done it better after it’s been drawn is a nagging thing that lasts forever.

Damn.

My good friend Richard Fairgray’s awesome comic book, “Blastosaurus,” is now available digitally via comiXology. What that means is you should pick up the first issue. Immediately. Right now.
Richard has colored and remastered the series from its original publication (which was never available in the U.S.), and I had some editorial input on it as well. Mostly, “Richard, this is great. When I can read more?”

Do yourself a favor and check it out. Right now right now.

comixology:

Blastosaurus debuts today via comiXology submit!

Nothing else to say but, “THIS.”
kickstandkids:

JPL is a champion.
chrissamnee:

:O OHMYGOD!!

Nothing else to say but, “THIS.”

kickstandkids:

JPL is a champion.

chrissamnee:

:O OHMYGOD!!

(Source: more-like-a-justice-league)

Superman turned 75 in 2013. Brian Stelfreeze masterfully shows you his evolution (minus the electric version. The less said about that, the better.)

Superman turned 75 in 2013. Brian Stelfreeze masterfully shows you his evolution (minus the electric version. The less said about that, the better.)

Before becoming a police officer in GA, Shane lived in New York City for a time and went by the name “Carlos.” Rumor has it he even had a brief dalliance with Canadian pop star Robin Sparkles.

Before becoming a police officer in GA, Shane lived in New York City for a time and went by the name “Carlos.” Rumor has it he even had a brief dalliance with Canadian pop star Robin Sparkles.

It’s true…?

It’s true…?

A young Tony Stark tests weapons systems in college.

A young Tony Stark tests weapons systems in college.